DGR Documentation& Handling

For hazmat to be shipped by air, there are specific procedures to be met. First, the shipper must meet their criteria, such as declaring the shipment as dangerous goods, properly completing the Dangerous Goods Declaration, and adequately preparing the shipment for transport. Then the cargo acceptance procedures are carefully enacted. Using the Dangerous Goods Checklist will make sure that what the shipper has submitted complies with the Dangerous Goods Regulations. Next, the operator must go over the Dangerous Goods Checklist and ensure all regulations are met within those guidelines.

While dangerous goods storage and handling occur throughout the proceeding, the loading process comes next. It is important not to store or load certain dangerous goods next to one another and never next to food items. All packaging must be secured, as well as other items being shipped so that they do not shift during transport and fall into the dangerous goods causing damage to their packaging.

Our first concern is safety. We have given dangerous goods training for all persons across the entire supply chain who prepare and offer, accept and handle dangerous goods.

The United Nations assigns dangerous goods to one of nine classes, and every dangerous goods will fall into at least one of the classes. It is essential to classify dangerous goods correctly so that the hazard(s) posed are communicated through the transport chain.

The dangerous goods classes are as follows:

  • Class 1—Explosives
  • Class 2—Gases
  • Class 3—Flammable Liquids
  • Class 4—Flammable Solids; Substances Liable to Spontaneous Combustion; Substances which, in Contact with Water Emit Flammable Gases
  • Class 5—Oxidizing Substances and Organic Peroxides
  • Class 6—Toxic and Infectious Substances
  • Class 7—Radioactive Material
  • Class 8—Corrosives
  • Class 9—Miscellaneous Dangerous Substances and Articles, Including Environmentally Hazardous Substances